Locations:

44 E. Jimmie Leeds Road, Galloway, NJ
421 Route 9 North, Cape May Court House, NJ
495 Jack Martin Blvd, Brick, NJ

Contact:

Call us: 609-652-6094
Email: info@vi-ami.com

Dialysis Fistulogram, Graftogram, or “Declot”


Atlantic Medical Imaging now offers the South Jersey / southern New Jersey region convenient access to Dialysis Access Interventions and maintenance procedures. 

The AMI interventional radiologists have a combined over 70 years of experience in minimally invasive endovascular techniques used in peripheral arterial disease, non-healing wounds, dialysis intervention, dialysis access management, dialysis access maturation, women’s health and uterine bleeding, and the cutting edge minimally invasive treatment of certain cancers. 

For more information on dialysis access interventions, graft maintenance, declotting, fistulagrams, angioplasty, arteriograms, thrombectomy and declotting, see below.

What is a(n) fistulogram/graftogram/angiogram for dialysis access intervention?

An angiogram/fistulogram is a test that is used to look inside your dialysis access. It's done to look for any narrowing or blockage in the access which can cause poor flow or pulsatility in the dialysis access.

Why do I need a(n) fistulogram/arteriogram/angiogram?

You may need this procedure because:

  • there is decreased blood flow to your access
  • you're having problems with your dialysis treatments because of your access
  • you're having symptoms such as swelling or pain

 

During the Procedure

A long, thin catheter (plastic tube) is inserted into your access. Contrast dye will be injected into the catheter. You may feel a brief warm, flushed sensation in the area when the dye is infused. X-rays are taken and if needed the fistula/graft will undergo angioplasty so that the vascular access can be maintained.

What happens after the procedure?

  • You will be taken to the recovery unit. You may stay for an hour or more.
  • You will need to lay quietly, with your arm straight.
  • Don’t do anything strenuous with your arm for the rest of the day (e.g., like vacuum).

What is Central Venous Occlusion?

Central venous occlusion (CVO) or central venous stenosis is a complication that sometimes results from the placement of prior central venous catheters.  This can occur in up to 40% of patients with previous central venous catheters, ports or pacemakers.  

This is especially seen in hemodialysis patients with a history of long-term catheter use.  When a fistula or graft is placed on the same side as a CVO, these lesions can cause significant symptoms such as upper extremity swelling, chest wall varicose veins, facial swelling, and pain.  When successfully treated with angioplasty and/or stent placement, significant improvement can result.

To schedule a consultation or a procedure call (609) 652–6094 or click here.

AMI's Endovascular Specialists have a combined over 70 years of experience in minimally invasive endovascular techniques used in peripheral arterial disease, non-healing wounds, dialysis intervention, dialysis access management, dialysis access maturation, women's health and uterine bleeding, and the cutting edge minimally invasive treatment of certain cancers.

VASCULAR INSTITUTE at
ATLANTIC MEDICAL IMAGING
609-652-6094
info@vi-ami.com